Events

SLAS Short Courses – Basel, Switzerland

SLAS, in collaboration with SBA, present the SLAS Short Courses in Basel, Switzerland:

3D Cell-based Assays for Drug De-risking

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Label-Free/Biophysics Methods for Screening

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Applied IT For The Laboratory

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When?
Friday, 26 September, 2014

Where?
Pullman Hotel
Basel, Switzerland


 

Registration Early Bird Rate
Before 31 August, 2014
Full Rate
After 31 August, 2014
Academic - SBA/SLAS Member*€300€390
Academic - Non SBA/SLAS Member€360€455
Industrial - SBA/SLAS Member*€485€605
Industrial - Non SBA/SLAS Member€545€665
 

* Fee-paying Members only

REGISTER
 


Accommodation


A special fee has been negotiated at the Basel Pullman Hotel for the SLAS Short Courses attendees: CHF140

Rate per single room/night, includes breakfast, free Wlan, the mobility ticket for free use of the public transportation in Basel, service and VAT. An additional city tax of CHF 3.50 pppd will apply.

The reservation can be changed or cancelled until three days prior to the arrival, free of charge. After this time, 100% cancellation rate will apply. Payment will be made on departure.

For reservations please contact Ute Langold at the Pullman Hotel directly before August 15, 2014


3D Cell-based Assays for Drug De-risking


The continually rising numbers of compound failures and increasing costs of drug and substance development are fostering the use of biologically more complex cell models. Physiological relevance is a key parameter to improve the predictive power of cell-based assays. The course covers advanced 3D cell culture technologies and their use in substance testing.

 
Topics:

  • 3D cell-culture technologies: Comparison of the most important scaffold-free and scaffold-based methods for 3D cell culture; implementation strategies, automation, and work flows; comparison of advantages, disadvantages and cost.
  • Assays and read-outs for 3D: Using and optimizing existing biochemical assays; applying imaging technology for growth-curve measurements; histology and immune histochemistry;high-content analysis.
  • Applications and cell-based models in oncology: 3D tumor models; co-culture systems; applications in screening of large libraries.
  • Applications and cell-based models for toxicology: Toxicology-related models derived either from primary cell sources or stem cells and their use for safety testing such as liver toxicology, inflammation-mediated toxicology.

 
Who should attend?
Industry and academic scientists with mid- to advanced-level experience in cell-based assays or cell biology wishing to get a concise overview about technologies, advantages, cost and application examples of 3D cell-based assays.

 
How you will benefit from this course:

  • Get guidelines how to develop 3D cell-based assays.
  • State of the art overview about current methods in the rapidly evolving field of 3D cell-based assays.
  • Solid starting point for participants interested in introducing 3D cell-based assays in their organisation.
  • Gaining expertise to use advanced cell culture models for substance testing.

 
About the instructors:

Dr. Markus Rimann
Zurich University of Applied Sciences
Switzerland

Dr. Markus Rimann completed his degree in Biology, specialty in Biotechnology, at the ETH Zurich in 2005. During his PhD at ETH Zurich he was working on non-viral gene therapy to improve cutaneous wound healing in rats. As Postdoc he was focusing on the usage and tracking of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of osteoporosis at the Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine (CABMM) in Zurich. For the last 3.5 years he’s working at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences in the Tissue Engineering group. His main interests are the application of 3D cell culture systems and bioprinting of different tissues, such as skin and muscle/tendon tissue for the purpose of drug development and substance testing.


Dr. Simon Messner
InSphero AG
Switzerland

Dr. Simon Messner, Senior Scientist and Product Manager at InSphero AG, Schlieren, Switzerland. He obtained his PhD at University of Zurich where he studied various post-translational modifications of Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 protein. After the completion of his PhD-studies, he joined InSphero in the year 2010 and was thereafter involved in product development of various 3D microtissues. He gained extensive experience in the application of 3D microtissue models for toxicology research, utilizing biochemical and cellular readouts.

Registration Early Bird Rate
Before 31 August, 2014
Full Rate
After 31 August, 2014
Academic - SBA/SLAS Member*€300€390
Academic - Non SBA/SLAS Member€360€455
Industrial - SBA/SLAS Member*€485€605
Industrial - Non SBA/SLAS Member€545€665
 

* Fee-paying Members only

REGISTER
 


Label-Free/Biophysics Methods for Screening

Gain an overview on the most relevant biochemical biophysics/ label-free technologies for screening and lead finding. Learn how this quite novel technologies toolbox helps drug discovery projects. Focus: biophysics assay applications that allow the detection, quantification and qualification of ligand/protein binding events with suitability for screening and hit follow-up. Learn the strategies of the technologies, key applications in drug discovery projects and usage regarding impact and limitations.

 
Topics:

  • Overview of the most relevant biochemical biophysics/ label-free technologies for screening and lead finding
  • Main technologies discussed in more detail: Mass Spectrometry; NMR; Calorimetry (DSC, ITC); SPR aka Biacore; Interferometry and Resonance Waveguide Grating (BLI aka Fortebio, Corning Epic); thermal protein denaturation and aggregation assays (DSF aka Thermofluor, DSLS aka Stargazer); Dynamic Light Scattering
  • Understand which technology does best fit to answer typical early drug discovery projects

 
The Course will provide:

  • An overview of biophysics approaches in the context of lead finding and screening
  • A thorough review of available instrumentation
  • Typical applications and guidelines how to apply the most relevant and appropriate technologies to cover the scientific needs
  • Better understanding of which technology best fits to individual project needs and scientific questions
  • Learn about typical applications and "best practice" as well as limitations.
  • Understand how the biophysics technologies relate to each other and how they augment data from other approaches
  • Be able to predict for a project which technology serves best in a typical drug discovery flowchart and understand at what place
  • Pros and cons of the technologies

 
Course focus:

  • “Biochemical” biophysics /label free applications that characterize the binding and mode of action for small molecular weight organic compounds to target proteins
  • Methods applicable with a certain throughput suitable for lead finding
  • Methods that are already established

 
Out of Scope:

  • An in depth introduction and discussion of the physical theory behind each label-free technology
  • Coverage of all available technologies and all variations
  • Cellular and label-free assay technologies which are better covered elsewhere

 
Who should attend?

  • Individuals who look to implement these technologies in their work-flow
  • Individuals familiar with Biophysics Methods but want to get a systematic overview
  • Experts in one of the fields who want to learn more about other approaches
  • Project leaders that want to understand what technologies suit their needs
  • Technology providers that want to gain more insight into needs of typical users

 
About the instructors:

Christine Genick, PhD
Investigator II/ Laboratory Head
Screening Sciences Group
Center for Proteomic Chemistry
Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel
Switzerland

Chris Genick started her career in the field of biophysics about 14 years ago. During that time she worked as a lead application scientist for various companies whose desire was to devise new label-free technologies for drug discovery and diagnostics. In the last 5 years at Novartis, she has dedicated her time in applying various label-free/biophysical approaches for HTS and FBS hit validation for lead discovery.


Dr. Jörg Weiske
Laboratory Head / Protein Technologies
Bayer Pharma AG
Global Drug Discovery – Lead Discovery Berlin

Jörg Weiske is working at Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals in the department Protein Technologies in Berlin. He is responsible for the protein expression, purification and characterization of protein for Structural Biology and Screening. As label-free technology he used Thermal Shift Assay for prioritization of protein constructs/buffer condition for Structural Biology and as Screening Technology in Drug Discovery.
He holds a PhD degree in Biology from the Free University of Berlin.


Dr. Timothy Sharpe
Head of Biophysics Facility
Biozentrum, University of Basel

Tim Sharpe has worked in academic science for 10 years, at first investigating protein folding mechanisms, and later working on protein chemistry and assay development in fragment-based drug discovery. He has used many biophysical methods to study protein stability, folding, oligomerisation and interactions. Since 2012 he has been the Head of the Biophysics Facility at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, where he manages instrumentation and provides training and advice to users as they employ biophysical techniques to answer a wide range of biological questions.

Registration Early Bird Rate
Before 31 August, 2014
Full Rate
After 31 August, 2014
Academic - SBA/SLAS Member*€300€390
Academic - Non SBA/SLAS Member€360€455
Industrial - SBA/SLAS Member*€485€605
Industrial - Non SBA/SLAS Member€545€665
 

* Fee-paying Members only

REGISTER
 


Applied Information Technology for the Laboratory


Data Management
in the Age of Big Data, Mobile, and the Cloud

This data management course provides decision makers and practitioners from bio-pharma, healthcare, and academia with a comprehensive overview of IT trends in laboratory automation, data management, and systems integration. It highlights the current hot fields in the area of data management, big data, cloud computing and mobile technologies.

The short course will bring you up to speed on these cutting edge technologies. It provides crucial guidance for assessing how these new technologies fit into your laboratory data landscape. The instructor supplies practical guidance and examples for how to apply these techniques to laboratory workflows.

Course Content:

  • Data Management
  • Data Representation
  • Databases, XML and Related Technologies
  • Scientific Data Management
  • Long-term Archival
  • Big data
  • What is big data? What is new about it?
  • Dealing with large data volumes or varying structure
  • Data representation: NoSQL and hierarchical data
  • Use cases and case studies in lab informatics
  • Data Standards: Structuring the repository content
  • Mobile
  • Mobile use cases for the laboratory
  • Which workflows can be supported effectively?
  • Addressing inherent limitations in bandwidth and computing power
  • Selecting devices and platforms to use
  • Addressing the "bring your own device" (BYOD) challenge
  • Cloud computing
  • Lab informatics cloud use cases and case studies
  • Public vs. Private Cloud, hybrid approaches
  • Balancing benefits and risks
  • Return on investment and total cost of ownership considerations
  • Authentication, security and trust concerns
  • Archiving considerations
  • Legal and regulatory status of cloud environments
  • Architecting a cloud solution for your organisation
  • Portability between cloud providers: Avoiding vendor lock-in

Who should attend?

Individuals looking for an overview of information technology topics relevant to a laboratory environment. The target audience for this class is laboratory IT decision makers and professionals from pharmaceutical, biotech, clinical companies, and research institutions. There are no prerequisites for this class.

How you will benefit from this course:

  • Learn about current and upcoming information technology and how to leverage them in a laboratory
  • Evaluate the suitability of cloud computing and understand its risks and benefits.
  • Become aware of how to integrate mobile devices into your laboratory workflows.
  • Understand how to store, manage, and analyse your data using traditional and big data technologies.
  • Survey applicable standards and architectures.

 
About the instructor:

Dipl. -Inf. Burkhard Schaefer
BSSN Software
Mainz, Germany
b.schaefer@bssn-software.de

Burkhard Schaefer is an independent consultant specializing in laboratory informatics applications. He is a regular contributor to the LabAutomation short course program and has been involved with the LECIS standardization effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the AnIML standardization project with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

He has been using XML for over 10 years and is currently working on standardized XML data formats for the documentation of laboratory workflows. He holds a Diploma of Computer Science from the Technical University of Kaiserslautern and has been teaching short courses for the SLAS for 11 years.

Registration Early Bird Rate
Before 31 August, 2014
Full Rate
After 31 August, 2014
Academic - SBA/SLAS Member*€300€390
Academic - Non SBA/SLAS Member€360€455
Industrial - SBA/SLAS Member*€485€605
Industrial - Non SBA/SLAS Member€545€665
 

* Fee-paying Members only

REGISTER